About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN2 33
LANGUAGE
English 33
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
so i'm glad you're here tonight. so after it came out in spain, and spanish at university of valencia, nauseous come out october 1st year in the state. and it changes the bunches of. a lot of the stuff i changed was john's idea. he said he was absolutely right. he said the ship to hear you don't think understand and he also made some wonderful suggestions. so we took a chapter out and instead put in an afterword, what it was like to get out of the diplomatic service and go to rutgers university where it been every since as a professor in the very late 60s, early 70s. i went there in 69 and i'm still there. i was supposed to go to vietnam as a u.s. cultural attachÉ in spain and by this time i thought the worst these idea and i'll say three little children i wasn't going to be in a non-gory work i didn't believe in, so i left the service. the four years before that bernstein. there's probably two stories they want to focus on this evening. one is about the day i spent along with martin as their king and richard of all places and the other run is about one of the really terrible events
model in spain. >> first of all, warren buffett, there again i think the contradictory as of all of this is at play. on the one hand, yes, there have always been people like him on the side of the wealthy, the big corporations, who have a clear understanding that at a certain point it becomes dangerous to keep going in that direction. you cannot keep having a smaller and smaller number of people doing really well in a sea of people that are having a harder and harder time. pushing, but don't kill the goose that lays the golden egg in the end. so there are always voices like that. not the only one. there are a whole bunch of people like that to see that and to have the courage or the comfort or the security to say it. remember also, the same warren buffett he says that is a major owner of the moody's corporation , and the moody's corporation was a central player in providing aaa ratings for securities we now know were worthless, are worthless, fraudulent, and someone. and so, you know, he is as he would himself admit a part of the system and therefore draw and to many of the activ
. but europe is also finding that green jobs are not all they thought that there would be. spain has just stopped its subsidy for solar power. a solar power does not work in sunny spain it is probably not going to work anywhere. gerry has also stopped its subsidies for solar power. there are a lot of clouds in germany. but the un has had a very strong influence on less. >> po will not old enough to remember, but jimmy carter gave billions of dollars to up alternate energy projects. >> i do remember. i was of the people who had to wait in gas lines in the 1970's. >> to any of those plants still exist? i don't think it lasted more than a couple of years. secondly, are you familiar with another program where he gave money to build five different steel mills, four of went with -- board of which went bankrupt almost immediately and the fifth one put at a business the plan in kansas city in. >> well, jimmy carter's programs did not work then, as i mentioned, i remember waiting in the 1970's in gas lines for one or two hours to fill up with gasoline in the western d.c. area. and just as thes
at the moment, but how did we ever let these excesses of housing here, housing in spain, housing elsewhere, in ireland, in this japan earlier -- in japan earlier, remember those days when you used to talk about the property around the imperial palace in tokyo, and a few hundred acres was equal to the value of all the real estate in california. now, that was real -- i don't know if it was true, but each to talk about -- but even to talk about it was a sense of how extremely -- [inaudible] >> do you share the, when you talk to fed officials, do you share -- >> i'm off the record here? >> no, not now. [laughter] no, no, you're fully mic'd. [laughter] when i talk to a fed official up there because happens to be power within the cia, um, they reveal and betray certain kind of frustration with the criticism they've been subjected including the criticism that they're easing too much because they say, well, that was the only course of action. we couldn't have done anything else in the face of a pretty -- political class. do you share that? >> well, they got it in both directions, and, you know, i
of what they had done. the queen of spain, the british parliament, two united states' presidents, supreme court justices, the american congress, the queen of england, they are all paying close attention to the debate. what do we do about these africans who have taken courage in hand and seized their own freedom? well, their self-emancipation, i want to suggest, had a lot of ripple effects around the atlantic, in europe, in africa, in the caribbean, and in america, especially in america where it had the impact of radicalizing the abolitionist movement, and by that i mean that more and more people began to recognize that the resistance of enslaved people was crucial to abolition. they began during the time of the rebellion to quote a famous line from lord byron. this is repeated again and again and again running all the way up to the civil war, and that line was those who would be free must themselves strike the first blow. in other words, action from below can be a trigger. this had a very dramatic impact op a lot of leading african-american intellectuals like henry highland-garnett, frede
spain. imagine. we got to spain, not quite sure where to go, and luckily my husband had family in hungary. but there are these iranian officials that have tons of money and they find homes in the west. ... >> good morning. thank you at ken timmerman, president ceo of the foundation for democracy in iran. we've been working at you for former political prisoners and the pro-freedom movement in iran. think some of you have mentioned it's clear president obama is owing to cut a deal or try to convey to you with the rain and regime over their nuclear weapons program that will have sacrificed for the people a rare iran. if you could add to this very good digestion that emanuele made earlier on the u.s. interest and rights agenda. i happen to believe the best investment we can make in u.s. national security is to help the people of iran get rid of the regime. >> thank you for the question. the united states has fairly good experience. many people assembled here today belong to the right age group. remember, some of you, the bad days of the cold war, but should also remember how the un
is not fine. what beshould do is start a war with spain or france. if we go that everyone will rally to the flag. the south will come in. everybody wants to be beat up on the europeans. he doesn't say it idly. he tells the ambassador from spain and france that it's a deal. the question is what does lincoln want to do. lincoln doesn't think the south is bluffing. he has a problem. the north is not unified behind a war effort. maybe only a third of northern want to fight a war to keep the south in union. about a third are happy about it. we get rid of them. they are fine. let's get rid of the south. we don't have to -- let them go. about a third don't care. we don't want them to leave we don't want to fight for it either. lincoln does something clever. some people want to spend armed expedition to reinforce sumter. some want to sneak these troops in to reinforce them. and they want to give it up. lincoln doesn't do any of them. lincoln announces publicly that he's going send an e petition it's only going to have food and no weapons or ammunition. just food. he's forcing the decision to
that is bursting now increase. or maybe that's bursting in spain. other countries in europe think back two or three years ago. was just as broke as it is today. yet they were able to borrow money and they paid a lower interest rates and everything was fine. it wasn't fine. it's just the bond holders were asleep. they were oblivious to the circumstances. and eventually they woke up and they demanded a higher rate of interest to compensate for the risk of holding the paper and now the government can't afford a higher interest rate, and now people realize that so they want their money back. so now there is a crisis. the only reason that we can service our debt is because the rate is so low. we can't be pay our debt. that's not even possible. all we can do is service the debt but of course once our creditors realize we can't, then they are going to want their money back and we can't pay it back. we can print it but then it isn't going to be worth very much. the key is going to be when are the creditors going to wake up and demand a rate of return on the dollar's? because right now the rate is zero and
as governor. spain was he the head of the church at the time? >> absolutely. >> was their political insight within the church and did he have rifles? >> not really he felt that he didn't have any rivals within the church especially after they get to utah. there are other people that put themselves forward as possible leaders after joseph smith's death, but at the time brigham young's faction of the church reaches utah, he has eliminated most dissent. in fact she brags that the church does not experience 10% of the dissent under his leadership as it had under joseph but he had a firm hand. >> how many wives did he have? >> only 55. >> how many children? >> 58? wohlstetter does he have descendants today? >> tens of thousands. if they but all by the book i would be very wealthy. >> were you able to talk with any of his descendants and researching pioneer profit? >> i didn't set out to talk with any of his descendants but there are quite a number of brigham young's descendants in utah and i spent a lot of time in utah during research for the book so i happened to meet some of his descendants. >
: i was born in spain, came to the united states when i was 2. my father's a spaniard, and my mother's from an italian-american family. i was interested in writing about marco rubio because, one, he's an avenn adapt politician who is going to have a say in what our country's immigration policy looks like, what our country's budget looks like. but also because his family history and his own political rise, it's just a great story. it reads like a novel. i was able to find these document requests that showed that -- documents that showed that his grandfather was born underneath a that muched palm roof in -- thatched palm roof in rural cuba to a mother who was illiterate in 1899. and to think that someone who was born under those circumstances that in barely over a hundred years his son, his grandson is getting talked about as a possible president of the united states. it's really, it's something that you would find in the movies. and, you know, i presented this book as a narrative of the family of marco rubio and about his really remarkable political rise, and i hope that people will b
in 1972 he wrote to the great empires in spain and russia, britain, each to to enter 50 years. in the empirical hegemony and the power leads to decadence and the short sleeves to short sleeves and generations from the exploration and exploitation to the decadence request for world approval to the welfare state and squabbles over inherited wealth and the notable feature he writes of the declining nations of the loss of physical energy. both recapitulate the human individual tendencies and like the individual human involved in the predictable directions the kunin light lived to be 120 years but no longer and will decatur the predictable stages as well the family. however wealthy and the state however powerful. and now we see we in america are at the outward end of the to hundred 50 years, and we see the signs positive. we passed through the ages of outburst conquest, commerce, of unscom into left and we've come to the age of decadence. this and all employers, she writes, can be identified by the defensiveness, pessimism, materialism, the welfare state, the dissolution of the arm
with angela merkel insistence on an austerity for greece, spain, italy? >> austerity? yes. there is no way you can do without problem with those various sponsors and sustainably go with the quid pro quo. but to do that to maintain austerity to be bailed out. over the indefinite period. this is where the rubber hits the road. where you need very disciplined policies and willingness to lend on the part of the creditors. they don't trust the borrowers who do not trust but they do for a few months. [inaudible] then a few months later so a little more discipline and a little more money. they said the vote provide the my a plan. but behind all of this side believe there is the enormous sense of commitment probably just in the part of the republic. i almost cannot imagine. and what would happen under this situation in? but with the conviction we've tried hour best but traditionally you cannot kick them while they are down. and a stand but the problem with the european union fed is monetary union's as opposed to the fiscal union. they benefited from the low interest-rate and that meant they allow the
at the beauty pageant. they tonight want to put their money in greece, spain or portugal, so they're putting it here. our interest rates are so low. that's not going to last forever. be you go back up to a long-term average of 6-8%, we add a trillion dollars in debt service and cost interests over ten years. the interest alone will swallow up half of our federal expenditures. we'll be paying china for their military. we can't allow this to happen. and i think that's one of the reasons why we're so proud to do this book, is we really are putting policies in place and gentlemen, regardless of who's president in january 2013, they're going to face the exact same problems we have today. somebody has to tackle it, and part of what this action-oriented institute is doing, this book is doing is putting those ideas out there so we can start having a discussion about, one, the importance is real, we're here today, and here's how you get reform in place with pro-growth policies. we've talked about the idea of greece and their debt crisis, economic studies have looked back over history about when do co
, if spain had joined the axis powers, it would have been defeated and would not have been a fascist country until a 70s. franco made a smart decision. the minute he did it would have been better if he made the opposite decision and maybe he was smart enough to know that. >> thank you. >> humble before the man. >> 9 a myth christine and it is an honor to hear you speak. i have a son, douglas, who finally turned off the tv and in the 3 players and picked up your book a number of years ago. it truly hooked him on reading. on his behalf and mine as a parent, i am curious to see what was the genesis of going from thrillers to historical fiction and including -- i am happy that you have a strong woman in each of your historical fiction. [applause] >> i was interested -- i used to look at cathedrals because of how beautiful they are and how serena in atmosphere a cathedral is but i very quickly became interested in how they were built. when you look at one of those european cathedrals you do think, how did medieval people get those enormous thoughts? not that i. know mathematics for constructing c
of versailles soon cause the structure to crumble into the totalitarian moment. spain, of course with its civil war was the first to see the future. the fascist rose to power in italy, then germany, then a samara totalitarian culture in japan where a fascination await anyone who questioned the destiny of japan to all of asia, the remaining democracies in europe lacked the will to stop even the weakest of aggressors. when mussolini successfully crushed ethiopia, and none of the league of nations states oppose them, that's higher -- it was already dead. this of course was long before hitler invaded poland. a world war ii let me only but they say that what saved the world in our view was that the progressive liberal, new deal government of franklin d. roosevelt, most likely out of sheer desperation unleashed a productive power of free market capitalism to bury the acid towers in a tsunami of tanks, planes, and ships. anyone who's read my my books knows the statistics of pink slime just not far from where i teach, a tank was built from scratch in four and a half hours. henry kaiser's shipyard churn
gave us a visa only if we didn't claim refugee status from spain. imagine. we got to spain, we did not know where to go. luckily enough, my husband it had family in hungary, but, i mean, iranian officials that have tops of money, and they find homes in the west. why? because they bring money with them, but then the disdance, honestly, when he landed in canada, we had $200 left in our pocket. we were literally hungry and no country was taking us, finally, canada -- and i'm so grateful to this country country of north that gave us a home where we had nowhere to be, just one thing, a little bit out of that, but i just need to make a point, are we going to get a time at the end? >> i'll give you time, sure. >> great, because there's something i have to add. >> okay, sure. the gentleman in the back row. >> good morning, the ceo of ther foundation,org, working with political prisoners, and i think some of you mentioned it's clear president obama is going to cut a deal or is going to try to cut a deal with the iranian regime over the nuclear weapons program that will, in fact, sacrifice p
the law expected to be challenged in a constitutional court. in spain in 2010 the catalonia and assembly narrowly rejected a proposed ban on a burke got in all public places reversing an earlier vote. similar laws are in progress in italy as well. in switzerland after a campaign designed to appeal to fears of a muslim takeover, a popular referendum voted by 57% to ban the construction of minarets associated with mosques, despite the fact that very few mosques in switzerland actually have minarets, there are only four minarets and the whole country on of 150 mosques and in consequence the architectural issue is clearly symbolic. in july of 2011, terror struck northern europe. murdered approximately 76 people in twin attacks bombing barbara and -- government buildings and shooting young representatives of the labor party who had gathered on the island for a youth camp. he confessed to the crimes but claims that he is not at fault, at least on the day of the attacks, 1500 page manifesto in which he outlined a series -- a theory supporting his actions based on the idea that europe must fight
this to the current congress and the news media. we are not spain or greece, we are not totally messed up. there's a country that gets the government to quit screwing that we would do fine over the next 20 years. [applause] imagine the consultant's report. if they cannot and said no we have easily the the situation and you have one act and 14,000 people. you think this is that? [laughter] you think you should be deeply depressed, then consider quitting to the congress that isn't doing well to be worthy of a couple hundred it doesn't deserve your loyalty. why don't you go home. >> these people wanted to be free. and they are prepared to die. when they cross the delaware on christmas night in a desperate last effort before the army seizes to exist, the slogan, the password is a victory or death, and they meant it. it wasn't victory or i will cry for six weeks. it wasn't a victory or not going to watch fox news for a month. it wasn't a victory i think i will pout. [laughter] these people were really passionate. about the idea that freedom was the right god had given them and they were not going to
, the ottoman empires, spain, russia, britain, each flourished for around 250 years, and this seems to be the space allotted for imperial he generalny. too long a period of power leads to decadence, so the empire goes from the pioneers to the innovators, to the bureaucrats, from exploration on exploitation to decadence, the quest for world approval, the welfare state and squabbles over inherited wealth. and a notable feature, he writes, of the declining nations is the loss of physical energy. he suggests, as does the bible, that the state of a human organism is no different than the family. both recapitulate human individual tendencies, and like the individual human, evolve in predictable directions. the human might, indeed can, live to be 120 years, but no longer, and will decay through predict blg stages as will the family, however well ty -- and the state, however powerful. and now we see we in america are at the outword end of sir john gloves' 250 years, and we see the signs. we have passed through the ages of outburst, conquest, commerce, affluence, intellect, and we've come to
and people in washington and news media, we're not spain, we're not greece, we're not totally messed up like europe. we would do fine over the next twenty years if we get government to quit screwing up. [applause] but imagine the consult assistant consult ant report if they said general washington, we have you have one ax and 14,000 people. we think this is bad. we think you should be deeply depressed and consider quitting. a congress isn't doing well enough doesn't deserve the loyalty. why don't you go home? they wanted to be free. and they prepared to die. when they crossed dpez on christmas night on a desperate and last effort before the army seizes to exist. the slogan, or pass word is victory or death. and they meant it. it wasn't victory cry or six weeks. or victory or i'm not going watch fox news for a month. it wasn't victory or i think i'll pout. all right people really passionate about the idea that freedom was the right god had given them. they weren't going fail god by giving it up. finally we get to yorktown, the last novel in washington. it's a great gamble. the country is exha
as filibusters, are of ancient origin. it was reported while caesar was in spain, the election of consuls was approaching. applied to the senate for permission to stand a candidate, but they reject the request and prevented his success gaining time with which he spun the debate until it was too late to conclude on anything that day. it's only been around 2064 years. don't believe the left when they say it was created in 1865. byrd would say otherwise. another speaker, norm, glad he's two seats away from me as i quote him, from 2005, said some things about republicans attempt to use nuclear options, options that i agree with. now, let me imp size this is a radical step it's taken. this will require breaking the rules, steam rolling the parliamentarian, and i've been disappointed in the reporting on the issue which tends to ice a kind of gloss and shorthand over matters making it appear as we are appearing to do it with a majority, just not elected to do it before. that's not the case. it's clear in the rules if you challenge a rule on constitutional grounds, that challenge is debatable, an
.3%. this at a time when the unemployment rate in spain is 26%, in france it is almost 11%, and across the whole eurozone it is almost 12%. employment, already at a record high, is set to go on rising each year of the forecast, and for every one job less in the public sector, two new jobs are expected to be created in the private sector. britain now has a greater proportion of its people in work than either the eurozone or the united states of america. mr. speaker, more jobs means that the impact of the weaker than forecast gdp on the public finances have been less than some might have expected. there have been three developments that have each had a significant one-off impact on the public finances, and in the report today we publish clearly and transparently the impacts of all three. first, there is the transfer of the royal mail pension fund to the public sector at part of its privatization. this produces a one-off reduction in the deficit of 28 billion pounds this year, but it adds to the deficit in the years afterwards. second, the previous goth had class -- government had classified northe
, the current news media, we're not spain, we're not greece, we're not totally messed up like europe. this is a country where if we could just get government to quit screwing up, we would do fine over the next 20 years. [applause] but imagine the consultant report if they came out and said, you know, general washington, we've evaluated the situation, and you have one axe and 14,000 people. we think this is bad. [laughter] we think you should be deeply depressed and consider quitting. [laughter] a congress that isn't doing well enough to be worthy of at least a couple hundred axes doesn't deserve your loyalty. why don't you go home. now, these people wanted to be free, and they were prepared to die. when they cross the delaware on christmas night in a desperate last effort before the army ceases to exist, their slogan, their password is victory of death. victory or death. and they meant it. it wasn't victory or i'll cry for six weeks. [laughter] it wasn't victory or i'm not going to watch fox news for a month. [laughter] it wasn't victory or i think i'll pout. [laughter] these people
as filibusters ancient origin. while caesar was in spain, the election of consoles was approaching. he applied the senate for permission to send a candidate, but cato strongly opposes request attempts to prevent his success by gaining time with which you until it was too late to conclude on anything that day. the filibusters only been around 2064 years since circa 59 b.c. don't believe the left of the falsely claim the filibuster was a mistake in 1805 by aaron burr. the late robert c. byrd would say otherwise. norman ornstein -- from 2005 cents in things about republicans and his nuclear option and judges that i agree with. now let me emphasize this is a radical step. this will require breaking the rules comes steamrolling parliamentarians and i must tell you it's been very disappointed in the reporting of this issue, which tends to use it kind of gloucestershire and other matters: making it appear as if this is some thing at any time can be done by a majority. they just have been elected to do it before. that's not the case. it's clear if each eligible on constitutional grounds the challenge
in spain. it comes with two different brushes -- in 2 minutes you will beatbox cleaning with skiingcleaning withsream. areas like the grout uktea in to get into those spaces and blow away the grease and grime with out chemicals. >>host: normally you do half to windows after your spray chemicals. you could use water with the bissell there is nothing else to buy. you just felt it with let it heat up and then let it do its job.getting two of them that is huge.@ retail that would be $78 but you are not spending that today is 2 flex payments of just about $30. we are just scratching the surface of what this does. >>guest: use this on many different surfaces such as title or your refrigerator. it would to a great job without chemicals. anyplace with food is the perfect solution. do not rely on chemicals. steam will clean and sanitize all the areas it will be perfect. are preparing food certainly the coffeepot all of those areas you can blasted away. you clean this event? all you can do is steam kit ask the way the grease and grime with ordinary tap water. there apis >>host: yikes! >>guest:
, spain, great britain and mexico. they were found on the issue of slavery in the territory and southern nationalism. when you think about the jefferson-jackson party formation what they had was truly affect. bottled up along the eastern seaboard and they gained control over course of 50 years of the entire continent, the pacific. there is no possibility is that americans could settle that territory of the time. the the united states gained control of the arizona territory in 1846. it didn't become a state until 1914. the louisiana purchase the would begin to settle it in the 1850's when the slavery issue for the country apart. the republican regime orchestrated the industrialization of the nation based on the concept of economic liberty, the tariff and the gold standard. in 1865 the united states was an agricultural country about 30 million. when they were overthrown and was a highly industrialized country and probably the most prosperous country in the world. that wasn't six ackley known by americans at the time. >> i met the party platforms of the republican party and the democratic
on trains in spain and other countries in china that go 250, 300 mules an hour -- miles an hour. you're never going to get a train going 250 miles an hour along the northeast corridor, nor would you want to. but in california where we're building new infrastructure, do it at 200 miles an hour which is what we're going to do. in illinois the best we can do is 110 miles per hour. would we like to go 200? of course we would, but it's not possible. >> so it's a, it's a standard that we can live with -- >> that's right. >> -- as high-speed rail. and then, um, you know, lastly, there's been some criticism as well that it's money that hasn't been spent yet. do you think it's actually even reasonable to have spent, actually spent the amount of money without developing the plans and rigorously reviewing those and making obligations for the studies that are required for those, and isn't it actually okay simply to have obligated the money and still ask for more because we can obligate more? >> what i'm proudest of, over the last four years you haven't seen any bad stories about boondoggles, ear
and i'd be happy to answer your questions. spain mr. chairman steve from cnbc. i have a lot of questions but i will offer a few here. why are there different targets for qe and for the funds rate? what does that achieve? secondly, what good is a target if you have to reference a calendar date. you pointed out in the statement that it's different from the calendar in october. do you have to keep doing that from now on and thirdly -- then you have another paragraph after that says, it's not just targeting something else though it's unclear what that these targets are if you have to reference the calendars date and the next calendar date it's not really targeted. >> well, first as i said the asset purchases and the rate increases have different objectives. the asset purchases are about creating near-term commitment creating growth and job commit in the near-term and the increases in the federal funds rate target when they ultimately occur are about accommodation. they are two very different objectives. secondly, the asset burgesses are a less well understood tool. we are learning over time
is look at southern europe to see what's going on. 25% unemployment in greece and in spain. imagine that the minority employment would be if we had 25% unemployment rate on average in the united states. we see pensions being cut without any notice hardly at all in these countries. we see social programs slashed. i think if we convince the representatives of the so-called disadvantaged groups that there is at least some probability that that will happen to us. i was a certainty that will happen to us eventually if we don't do something about the situation. i would think it'd be much more sober in their demands. at this moment i don't see it. >> i would say that a lot of this is before talking inside the beltway, that's a different conversation in the wake of of outside the beltway. part of the disservice the debate is happening today as it is steering away from what the real issues are common to most pressing issue, which is a sovereign potential for the debt crisis ever optimistic. it's steering the conversation away or not and it is not helping ordinary americans understand that th
to spain and the ski slopes in the western united states. she's been at one point during the period of several months, 42 days on vacation. she is living the life of a very pampered woman and apparently this fits with her personality. >> you right, where's the clintons were open and above horrid about their co-presidency posting that hillary was an equal partner with bill, the obamas have been careful to hide the fact that michelle is the president's most important political adviser and the one he listens to above all others before he makes decisions. >> yes and i think that's so true. the way she does that is often through her very best friend, how she gets her opinions through. her very best friend, valerie jarrett. valerie jarrett is a woman who hired michelle many many years ago to work with her in mayor daley's administration in chicago. the more importantly valerie jarrett is the person who comes from a very well off african-american family with great connections to power sources all over chicago. when she introduced barack and michelle obama to the power center, african-amer
, and in my state, at least from two countries, spain and germany, we have been able to export -- or import jobs -- or i should say import the ability to create jobs through foreign investment in my state for the component manufacturing. so it's been a success so many ways. and maybe one other thing that ought to be emphasized at this time where some of our members and maybe more members in the other body seem to be more cynical about any sort of investment in green energy because of solyndra and other places where taxpayer money has gone in the way of grants and then there has been immediate bankruptcy so the wasting of the taxpayers' money. there is no -- absolutely no benefit from the wind energy tax credit unless you actually produce electricity from it. so it's not going to be one of these situations where taxpayer money through a tax incentive is going to go to some company and not reap the benefits of it, the end result in this case being the production of wind energy. the production tax credit for wind is working and should be a part of the effort in washington to get more americans
in greece and spain. imagine what the minority unemployment would be if we had a 25% unemployment rate on average. we see pensions being cut without any notice at all. we see social price ramps slashed. so i would think if we can convince the representatives of the so-called disadvantaged groups that there is at least some probability that that will happen to us, i would say a certainty that will happen to us eventually if we don't do something about the situation, i would think there would be much more sober in their demands. but at this moment i don't see it. >> i would say, you know, that a lot of this is, you know, if we are talking inside the beltway, that is a different conversation of we go outside the beltway. part of the disservice that the debate is having today is that it is -- it is steering away from what the real issues are, the most pressing issue, which is the potential for a sovereign debt crisis and more optimistic. you know, steering the conversation away from that. and it is not helping ordinary americans understand what the threat is over a somewhat longer term. of
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)